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Film Glossary/V

1 – 9 A B C D E F G H
I J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z

varispeed. Varying the speed that a TV shows runs by speeding up (usually) or slowing down show on the tape to fit a prescribed time slot.

VCD. Video Compact Disk. A CD ROM standard that plays up to 80 minutes of full motion video and audio at near VHS quality which was introduced in 1993, three years before DVDs. Was widely used in Asia and plays on Asian-made CD and DVD equipment. VCD uses MPEG-1 for compression and is easier to produce than a DVD. It is professionally produced for corporate projects since it plays on a PC but not for the consumer market in the U.S. due to its inferiority to DVD and its incapability of being played on most U.S. CD and DVD players.

velvet. (noun or verb) A square piece of black velvet cloth used to clean picture and sound film reels before a screening.

vertical blanking. Similar to the film frame line that divides one frame of film from another, vertical blanking defines sequential units of video tape picture information. It also encapsulates time code, sync pulses, the ability to record test patterns, and closed-captioning info. It occurs when the scanning beam moves from the bottom of one video field to the top of the next field. See also blanking.

VFX. Visual Effects. Digital effects created or completed during postproduction such as blue screen, composites, key frames, etc.

video delay. A split edit where audio starts first and video second.

visible time code. LTC burnt in (superimposed) over video so that the image and time code can be seen together.

vision mixer. British term for switcher. See switcher.

VITC. Vertical Interval Time Code. Time code that’s encoded on the “video frame line” (the vertical interval between video frames of the video signal) as a series of black and white pulses during production. Can be read during pause mode and can encode other info such as reel number and film key code. It requires special decks to decode it so it can be read and must be regenerated with each dub as it deteriorates.

volume. See gain.

VOT. Reporter’s Voice on Tape. News editing term for voice over.

VTR. Video tape recorder. Tape deck (analog or digital) that records video and audio.

VU. Volume unit for both analog and digital signals.

VU meter. Calibrates audio to ensure consistent levels are throughout a show by displaying the db (decibel) level of the audio during mixing or recording.