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Inside Film Editing: Great Cuts Every Filmmaker and
Movie Lover Must Know

Film Editing: Great Cuts Every Filmmaker and Movie Lover Must Know

If you’ve ever wanted to understand how movies are put together, Film Editing: Great Cuts Every Filmmaker and Movie Lover Must Know is an easy, fun way to learn. With 600 frame grabs from great and popular movies created since 2004, the book helps you see through a movie to its building blocks – the cuts – that make up its scenes and sequences. In less than 200 pages, the book holds up a looking glass to every type of cut from all genres of movies: drama, thriller, documentary, horror, biopic, action-adventure, samurai, anime, musical, and comedy.

Film Editing: Great Cuts Every Filmmaker and Movie Lover Must Know includes a glossary of editing terms, synopsis of films used, filmography, and bibliography.

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From the book’s Foreword:

this visual toolkit provides… filmmakers the tools they need to realize their creative ideas and will serve as a springboard for invention…

Chandler’s insights into how edits are used to excite audiences to laughter and tears or make bad cuts work will also delight every moviegoer who enjoys being a sophisticated entertainment consumer.

From an instructional design stand point; this book offers film teachers a clear-cut and an economical approach to traditionally complex material. This book is a valuable resource with great ideas for movie clips that demonstrate and contextualize editorial concepts.

By taking a visual approach to a visual medium, Gael Chandler’s accessible digest makes an exciting contribution to the literature on editing. It’s clear that she loves the movies, knows her craft and has a methodical mind that provides us hard won clarity on the elusive art of editing.

Foreword written by Wendy Apple, Award-winning producer/director of The Cutting Edge: The Magic of Movie Editing among other projects and adjunct professor USC, Cinematic Arts

Example from book – Chapter 1

POV (Point of View) – A POV edit is a cut to what a character is seeing. Matching the angle on a POV is critical to the audience’s accepting the connection between the character and what they are seeing as this cut illustrates:

  • Frame1
  • Frame2

Eyeing the pirates down the beach.

Pirates of the Caribbean-Dead Man’s Chest, ©2006 Disney, All Rights Reserved.

Table of Contents

Chapter One – Basic Cuts
Introduction
Cut
Reverse cut
POV
Reaction
Insert and cutaway
Sound cut
Wrap up

Chapter Two – Match Cuts
Introduction
Screen direction
Eyeline
Angle
Framing
Shape
Sound
Lighting and color
Action
Rope
Idea
Wrap up

Chapter Three – Rogue Cuts: Mismatches, Jump Cuts, Crossing the Line, and Bad Cuts
Introduction
Mismatch
Jump cut
Crossing the line
Bad cut
Wrap up

Chapter Four – Cuts that use Basic Effects
Introduction
Cut
Dissolve
Fades
White out
Black out
Flash frame
Superimposition
Wrap up

Chapter Five – Cuts that use Complex Effects
Introduction
Split screen
Matte and inset
Green screen
Wipe
Wrap up

Chapter Six – Cutting for Pace, Rhythm, and Time
Introduction
Compressing time
Smash cut
Expanding time
Stopping time
Subjective time
Flash cut
Subliminal cut
Universal time
Wrap up

Chapter Seven – Cuts that use Time Effects
Introduction
Freeze frame
Slo mo
Speed up
Reverse motion
Wrap up

Chapter Eight Cutting Scenes
Introduction
Exposition
Flashback
Flashforward
Montage
Parallel action
Cross cutting
Overlapping action
Final wrap up
Synopsis of films
Glossary
Filmography
Bibliography

The website author acknowledges the copyright owners of all motion pictures from which single frames have been used for purposes of commentary, criticism, and scholarship under the Fair Use Doctrine.